Skip to content ↓

Frogmore

Junior School

Penguins Bring Maths Fun to Frogmore School

Maths specialist Sam Parkes from the University of Chichester Academy Trust brought ‘365 Penguins’ to Frogmore Junior School for a whole-school Winter Maths Workshop that combined story-telling and environmental education with stimulating maths investigations. Fortunately, the parade of penguins stayed mainly on paper and in the children’s imagination so no zoo-keeper was needed.

Maths specialist Sam Parkes from the University of Chichester Academy Trust brought ‘365 Penguins’ to Frogmore Junior School for a whole-school Winter Maths Workshop that combined story-telling and environmental education with stimulating maths investigations. Fortunately, the parade of penguins stayed mainly on paper and in the children’s imagination so no zoo-keeper was needed.
 
The humorous but thought-provoking story by Jean Luc Fromental was presented in assembly by maths leader Lindsey Pell, before prompting each class to investigate a linked area of maths. The tale begins on New Year’s Day when a surprised family receives a penguin from a deliveryman with an unsigned note: “I’m number 1. Feed me when I’m hungry”. By the end of January there are 31 penguins and February brings another 28. Every day of the year another penguin arrives and the children help to calculate the weight and cost of the penguins’ fishy diet. The mystery of the penguins is finally solved on 31 December when explorer Uncle Victor arrives to admit that his postal plan was not the best way to protect endangered wildlife.  
 
Frogmore Junior School Headteacher, Mrs Sarah Thorpe said, ‘The children loved the comical story of the penguins and it inspired keen interest in working out the maths behind the narrative.’  
 
Mrs Parkes explained, 'Through investigating interesting mathematical questions, the children developed their abilities to organise information and tackle problems based on the story. A wide range of maths was covered across the school including the structure of our yearly calendar, mental calculation skills, the volume of cubes, understanding of shape, division and fractions. As they worked, the children showed their ideas through poster making, construction, drawings, tables and recording their ideas and conversations on speech and thought bubbles. Examples of these along with lots of photos were used to make visually exciting maths displays round the school.’